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Elk Hunting with Eastmans’ 2015 Hunt Winner

Go elk hunting with Guy Eastman and the 2015 EASTMANS’ BOWHUNTING JOURNAL hunt winner. The elk rut action is hot in this web edition of Eastmans’ Hunting TV. The crew is almost run over by a pair of fighting bull elk. This hunt ends up close and personal with a rifle kill at less than 25 yards!

The post Elk Hunting with Eastmans’ 2015 Hunt Winner appeared first on Eastmans' Official Blog | Mule Deer, Antelope, Elk Hunting and Bowhunting Magazine | Eastmans' Hunting Journals.

  36 Hits
36 Hits

Lightest Weatherby Rifle Ever! The Backcountry TI

Hunter Todd Helms reviews Weatherby’s ALL NEW Backcountry T1 rifle in 6.5-300 Weatherby Magnum. Packed with new features this rifle is meant for fast and light travel in the backcountry. A fluted barrel, titanium action and carbon fiber stock minimize weight. The 3DHEX recoil reducer on the stock means a shooter get the benefits of a magnum cartridge with little kick. This model also features a brand new muzzle break that’s truly streamlined with the barrel.





The post Lightest Weatherby Rifle Ever! The Backcountry TI appeared first on Eastmans' Official Blog | Mule Deer, Antelope, Elk Hunting and Bowhunting Magazine | Eastmans' Hunting Journals.

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7 Tips, Tricks and Tactics to Help Perfect Your Stalk

I couldn’t believe it. I had done it again. Complete and utter failure. Another blown stalk on the same big buck, maybe this deer-hunting thing just wasn’t my game. This was the second time I had a chance at a stalk on the same 30-inch deer. A 30-incher would have been a pretty darn good reward for a solo sixteen-year-old, public land, DIY hunter. I would have to wait nearly another 15 years to get another crack at one. But this time it was over for good. The buck finally had enough of me and scurried over the ridge top into the next unit. Three days of tinkering with this high-country giant was more than could be expected. A records book typical buck would have been outstanding for me but it was all over. I thought it just wasn’t meant to be, if I only knew then, what I know now.

As painful as it may be for me at this point, let’s outline the seven tips, tricks and tactics that I failed to master as a young hunter. These simple points will help you learn to hedge your bets on your next stalk. All seven of these valuable lessons cost me numerous bucks at an early age, don’t let them happen to you.

Play It Safe- When you plan your stalk, always, always err on the side of caution. Just remember, finding a big buck or bull is nearly 65% of the equation. Don’t erase that 65% by pushing it on a foolish stalk. Once you have found the buck or bull you’re after, play it safe and wait for him to make a mistake. Sometimes that mistake can take days to materialize, particularly in the high country or on a bowhunt. If you find yourself in a situation where the variables start to drift toward the unpredictable or risky, just stay put and remain patient. Nothing lasts forever, even bad luck and swirling wind. Keep calm and refer to rule #7.Stalk Only When it’s in Your Favor- Timing of the stalk can be as important as the details of the stalk itself. Many a time, I’ve found myself hunkered down in a holding pattern, 500-yards below the ridgeline a big bull is feeding on, for hours waiting for the thermals to change. A few times the thermals even failed to settle before darkness fell over the ridge forcing me to play it safe and pull out to try again another day. The initial stalk is all about the plan, the wind, the sightline and the path. The final stalk is usually as reliant on timing as it is the wind direction. I try to never, under any circumstances execute a final stalk if the odds are not in my favor. That means, a good, out of sight sightline, a steady wind in my face and a good landmark to shoot for that offers a good rest and out-of-sight view. Think of it this way, it’s like a boxing match, tick for tack, it’s all about the strategy of keeping the odds in your favor and out of favor for your target. And trust me, it won’t take much to flip the odds against you in the backcountry. One slight swirl of the wind or an unaccounted for cow or spike can easily take you out of the game completely.“Be the Job,” Patience, Patience, Patience – The three P’s of success when it comes to stalking trophy big game. The patience play was extremely hard for me to master when I was younger. It can be tough, even excruciating for a younger, more inexperienced hunter to simply lay there and watch a big old buck or bull for hours or even days through a spotting scope waiting for the right time to make a move. It just takes time for things to materialize. Sometimes you just have to wait for that big high-country buck to move off that peak or drift down the bench below the big open basin where you can get close enough to make a good shot. There’s no real shortcut to this, you just have to be patient. Patience really is a virtue. It doesn’t come natural for most of us. It’s a learned skill that must be constantly worked on throughout our lives. It does get easier as we get older, I can tell you that much. On occasion you may find yourself within shooting distance of a bedded buck or bull. When this does happen, you guessed it, be patient. In my experience a big buck or bull will only lay in one position for about two or three hours before needing to get up and adjust his position. The old school method of throwing a rock or whistling can be a very dangerous proposition indeed. About 30% of the time the wary old battler will have a sixth sense you are there and stand up on the run. This situation is far less than ideal and I almost always prefer to let the buck or bull stand up on his own before I take the shot. The risk is just too high to do it otherwise. Watch from a Safe Distance- The hunter always has the advantage if the buck or bull has no idea they are even there. That’s why so many guys, like myself are so reluctant to call a big bull elk. Once he knows you are in his domain, he changes his behavior, which causes the tables to turn on you. This is the stay put and remain patient part. I like to observe a big buck or bull for as long as it takes from a safe distance. This can be as far as two miles in some circumstances and generally not closer than 700 or 800 yards away. I find that in most situations, a good distance is about 1,200 yards or the equivalent of about ¾ of a mile is sufficient. This distance will give you the flexibility to move around somewhat, whisper to your partner, pack up your spotting scope and prepare for the stalk undetected. Don’t Get Too Close- Is there such a thing as too close? For a bowhunter there probably isn’t. But for the rifle hunters among us, yes, there is such a thing as too close. I try to plan my stalks to end up between 200 and 300 yards away from the target. Too many times I’ve found myself accidentally within only 75-yards or less of a big buck or bull only to have the situation blow up in my face. Once you get that close a big mature animal will have a sixth sense which will alert him to your presence often before you even have the time to make a mistake. The ultra close range, up close and personal type encounter just doesn’t give you the flexibility to adjust your stalk or shot set up, often times forcing you to make a hurried, off hand shot at a traveling target. Like my wife would say, “No Bueno.” On the other side of the coin, the mindset that you need to shoot long-range in most practical big game hunting situations is purely a myth. Even the biggest of the big bucks and bulls will allow you to get close enough for a good ethical 300-yard shot, if you’re patient and stalk properly. I’ve been blessed with over a dozen Boone and Crockett qualifying trophies and not one of them was taken beyond 450-yards. The average take yardage on all 12 was only about 186-yards. Not exactly what most of us would consider ultra long-range. Stick to your guns, be patient and don’t get lazy on the stalk. If you feel the uncontrollable urge to shoot ultra long-range you might consider doing some bowhunting. You might come out the other end with a different outlook on stalking. I know bowhunting has made me a much better rifle hunter in more ways than one. Play the Stalk and Shot Out in Your Mind- As you already know by now, this is as much about mental fortitude as it is about physical aptitude. As soon as I begin my transition on the initial stalk, I start playing the scenario out in my head over and over again. Will I get it completely correct, probably not, caca happens. But I believe this not only opens my mind for the unforeseen but it also helps to get my mind acquainted with what’s about to happen. Stick and ball sport athletes use this method of near self-hypnotism all the time. Along with this, it’s very, very important that you develop your own unique pre-shot routine. I have a very structured pre-shot routine that I go through nearly every time I set up to make a shot at my target. A consistent order of events, and unique way of doing things in the final moments leading up to the shot. Steps such as how I load my gun, how I set up on my rest, slide the safety off, focus on the shoulder, exhale, straight squeeze the trigger and a calm smooth follow through, followed up by a shell jack and follow up shot if necessary. Going through this pre-shot routine in your head while stalking is very critical to consistency, accuracy and an avoidance of costly last minute mistakes. Don’t be Afraid to Eat the Tag- This is much easier said than done, right? In my career I have eaten some very good tags. During my earlier years, I was a total basket case when the thought of eating a good tag came to mind as a seven-day hunt rolled into day six. The panic in my mind, made me hunt different. Hunting from a panicked state of mind basically undoes everything previously written about in this article. Pretty soon you will find yourself trying to stalk a bull with the wind at your back or going straight at a buck across the middle of the basin instead of going around and coming in from above because it’s faster. It’s purely mental once you remove the fear of eating a tag you can stick to your guns and hunt like you should, clear up to the end. Unfortunately, it takes a few good, hard tag “eats” to get used to the taste.

 



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6 Hits

The Greasy Hillside Of Outlawing Trapping!

One Greasy Hillside to be Standing On: California Bans Fur Trapping and What That Might Mean for the Rest of Us

This is a very, very slippery slope indeed. Earlier this month the Wildlife Protection Act of 2019 was signed into law by California Governor Gavin Newsome. This law absolutely prohibits fur trapping commercially and recreationally in the Golden State. Although this is very bad news for trappers in California it may be a signal of even worse things to come down the pipe for the rest of us no matter where we reside. 

First off, trapping is a western tradition which expanded the Western frontier in the early to mid 1800s. If not for trapping much of the West may look and feel very different to what we know today. Trapping is a tradition worth keeping if not purely for the conservation side of the equation alone but for the historical aspects that it represents as an integral part of our history as a country and our heritage as a conservationist rooted society. 

There’s an age-old adage in environmental engineering that says, “the solution to pollution is dilution.” And this may be no different, as we now find ourselves as hunters to be the dilute. Our Western and outdoor traditions are not only being threatened and trounced on, they are being diluted by coastal transplants. The states of Colorado and Montana are being severely diluted by a steady tidal wave of influx by the states of California, Oregon, Washington as well as the East coast relocations. If you don’t believe me, just take a quick weekend trip to Bozeman, Boulder or Jackson Hole. This transfer of populous will not bode well for us as hunters in the future as many of these people bring with them their expectations, politics and votes. And to make things worse, many of the long-time rural residents of some of these states are moving to places like Wyoming and Idaho to get away from the political problems an influx like this brings with it. Besides California, extremely large influxes into Wyoming are coming from the states of Colorado, Oregon and Texas. 

Colorado residents will more than likely lose their ability to trap in the next decade followed shortly behind by Montana and New Mexico. It’s coming and coming fast. I pass by the giant anti-trapping propaganda billboard in Billings every time I make a run to Costco. Colorado and New Mexico residents nearly lost their trapping rights earlier this year. 

I am not a trapper, and never have been however I am a descendant of trappers and frontiersmen and I also understand where this is all headed. Much like the gun debate this is a very slippery slope and this is  just the beginning to outlawing more and more hunting related activities. It’s trapping today and predator hunting tomorrow and trophy hunting the day after. There is no quit in these ideals and beliefs. The extremists have finally learned how to use the court systems and the electoral loopholes to outlaw what they don’t want in society. As we all know, managing wildlife from the ballot box or the courtroom is a very dangerous endeavor and puts the entire North American Model of Wildlife Conservation and in jeopardy. A quote in the Los Angeles Times says, “The ban also comes as California lawmakers consider even more aggressive measures to protect animals and wildlife, often threatening age-old traditions.” Think about that for a moment. They are talking about you!

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36 Hits

Leupold SX-4 Pro Guide Spotting Scope






Todd Helms reviews and tests out Leupold’s SX-4 Pro Guide HD spotting scope in 15-45x65mm. Excellent clarity in low light and harsh sun conditions make this spotting scope versatile. Optimum placement of the focus ring, an oversized eye piece and a unique rotation feature make this scope comfortable to use for long periods of time and in a variety of positions. The Leupold spotting scope body is built of a rugged magnesium that is water and fog proof to withstand all conditions.

The post Leupold SX-4 Pro Guide Spotting Scope appeared first on Eastmans' Official Blog | Mule Deer, Antelope, Elk Hunting and Bowhunting Magazine | Eastmans' Hunting Journals.

  45 Hits
45 Hits

Stone Glacier Sky 5900 Giveaway

If you’re a sheep hunter you’ve probably heard of Stone Glacier and if you’re into ultralight backpack hunting you’ve also probably heard of them. These are great, simplistic packs that have been around awhile now and they continue to prove themselves in the field. Stone Glacier packs have always been built out of the most lightweight Cordura possible without compromising durability. All straps and buckles are really well thought out and serve a very refined purpose which make this one of the most efficient packs on the market. Specifically, the Sky 5900 pack comes with the XCurve frame and has a total weight of 5 lb. 8oz. Sign up for this giveaway by filling out the form below. Good luck!

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The post Stone Glacier Sky 5900 Giveaway appeared first on Eastmans' Official Blog | Mule Deer, Antelope, Elk Hunting and Bowhunting Magazine | Eastmans' Hunting Journals.

  37 Hits
37 Hits

Call Wise Bulls

As late summer light melts off the West faces, velvet bulls materialize from the shadows for a lazy evening of feeding. Bulls are on easy street, packing on the pounds and inches of antler. Bulls are most visible this time of year, as their tender velvet keeps them out of the thick cover. As the month of August wanes, velvet becomes itchy and bulls start rubbing. Mature bulls begin to get antsy and territorial leading to them splitting off solo for a short time before the rut starts. They’ll stay in summer mode for about 10 more days, which means out early in the evening to feed and down late in the morning to bed in heavy cover. The extra time they are on their feet is the Achilles heel for the bowhunter. This short window gives you the best chance over any other time of the season to kill a big bull. 

There’s a couple ways to do this and you’ll probably only get one chance. Depending on the state you’re hunting, the best time to kill a big bull using this method is from Aug 28th to about Sept 8th, give or take a couple days on either end of that. The tactics I’m going to discuss should apply for most of the West where you can find elk in open country or at tree line in the high country. The exceptions are much of New Mexico and Arizona’s elk habitat. 

For spot and stalk I like to hunt open country at tree line. As long as you have conducive stalking terrain you’ll be in good shape. Once you locate a big solo bull, congratulations – that was the hard part. Watch him for a day or two and learn his habits. Make notes when he comes out in the evening and goes to bed in the morning and plan accordingly. You might have to wait a couple days for him to be in a good spot or he might be very killable immediately. There’s no do-all equation for knowing this it comes with experience. Obviously, terrain and wind are important and even the savviest hunter may struggle to get a bull killed in the high country. 

For thick country like most of New Mexico and Arizona, with early season bulls you’re going to have to rely on bugling or sitting wallows. I have found that late August and early September produce the best wallowing activity, especially if it’s hot out. Setting trail cams will get you dialed on activity over wallows and can be effective helping punch your tag if that bull regularly makes visitations to the mud bath. 



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45 Hits

On The Go Hunting Maps – The Basemap App

Public land hunter Scott Reekers shares his experience and favorite features using the mobile mapping app Basemap. Reekers found the app to be loaded with features to improve your hunting experience. From accurate path tracking to customizable pins and markers that can be shared with hunting partners the app gives you the power to e-scout and execute when season opens. Basemap features offline maps available in resolutions or your choice. A unique photo sharing social feed built into the app gives you the choice to share your adventures publicly, with select friends or not at all to protect your favorite hunting honey hole.

The post On The Go Hunting Maps – The Basemap App appeared first on Eastmans' Official Blog | Mule Deer, Antelope, Elk Hunting and Bowhunting Magazine | Eastmans' Hunting Journals.

  40 Hits
40 Hits

Four Strategies for Successful Trophy Antelope Hunting

Many hunters consider an antelope hunt as an afterthought on their way to or from elk and mule deer hunts. For them, the opportunity and challenge of taking an excellent trophy antelope is lost. Whereas taking multiple trophy mule deer bucks, for example, is a difficult accomplishment, harvesting several DIY B&C antelope bucks is actually an attainable goal. 

My four key strategies to successful trophy antelope hunting are actually quite basic.

First: There’s the strategy of hunting the same quality area each year that you draw a tag. Stay the course, don’t get discouraged or jump around to different areas or states. I know several guys, myself included, that have taken numerous book heads out of the same area over the years. The area that I hunt now isn’t noted for a lot of book antelope but my ability to know where to look and what country will hold antelope in certain weather conditions puts the odds in my favor. 

If you’re serious about harvesting a book buck, that’s the #1 strategy for success. Using that tactic, you’ll become an expert in hunting a particular area. Book bucks on public land are few and far between; knowing the ins and outs of the country will give you an edge on locating that 1 in 500 buck. The odds of harvesting a trophy buck antelope increase considerably if you’re in familiar territory. I’ve taken many B&C antelope and the key element to my success is knowing the unit inside and out. That’s the single best piece of advice I can give you. Many states change their unit numbers and hunt dates from one year to the next, so keep yourself abreast of and up to date on each state’s proclamations and regulations.

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40 Hits

Seek Outside Lanner 4500 Giveaway

The Lanner is designed to be large enough for a 10 day cold weather trip, yet compress into a sleek daypack.  A large mesh stuff pocket and two zippered security pockets on the face of the pack make organizing your gear a breeze, and the innovative shroud pocket functions as a lid when the pack has a smaller day load in it.  Sign up for this giveaway by filling out the form below. Good luck!

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The post Seek Outside Lanner 4500 Giveaway appeared first on Eastmans' Official Blog | Mule Deer, Antelope, Elk Hunting and Bowhunting Magazine | Eastmans' Hunting Journals.

  20 Hits
20 Hits

Two D-I-Y Archery Elk

Two public land bulls eat dirt in this web edition of Eastmans’ Hunting TV. DIY bow hunting isn’t for the faint of heart. Dan Pickar and Jordan Breshears put on the miles to fill their elk tags in Montana.

The post Two D-I-Y Archery Elk appeared first on Eastmans' Official Blog | Mule Deer, Antelope, Elk Hunting and Bowhunting Magazine | Eastmans' Hunting Journals.

  26 Hits
26 Hits

4 Elk Poached in Montana

Seriously Montana? Four bull elk poached and left to rot in the last week, all in one area? Well, I can’t get too upset with you because down here in Wyoming, not far from my home, we just had a bull poached, his head taken and body left to bloat in the 90 degree heat, over the holiday weekend. 

One of 4 elk killed over the weekend.

But still, the four bulls poached in Musselshell County is not only disheartening, it’s maddening. I don’t know what the motive is but I have to wonder if Montana’s booming population in areas like Bozeman, Kalispell and others has led to an increase in demand for cheap elk mounts to hang over a ranchette fireplace. Obviously, this is pure speculation but still….

Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks is undoubtedly doing their best to get to the bottom of this poaching spree but the County is vast and sparsely populated so catching these degenerates in the act or stopping them before they can poach again will be a tall order. 

My question is this… are we asking too much from our game and fish agencies when we expect what is often one warden to patrol areas the size of Rhode Island? I say we are and I also say that until we step up funding for additional personnel, poaching will continue to be a major problem. 


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18 Hits

Alaska Guide Creations Giveaway

Here’s your chance at an Alaska Guide Creations Binocase! These can compliment binoculars that around 42 mm Objuective lenses.These lightweight case are tough as nails and will hold against any weather you might encounter in the field. Thanks to the large pockets the Kodiak C.U.B. can hold lots of items such as range finders, mouth calls and more! Sign up for this giveaway by filling out the form below. Good luck!

 

 

 

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18 Hits

DON’T CHASE THE LIGHT WEIGHT RABBIT

An early snowstorm was hitting the high country and my hunting partner and I were socked in as bad as you could imagine. To save weight, our choice for this trip was a tiny three-season, two-man shelter and we were seriously regretting that decision. To add insult to injury, my hunting partner decided to bring a 30-degree sleeping bag with him (to save weight) and at this point the temperature was dipping below 20 degrees. In all fairness, I pulled a few level 3 chucklehead gear decisions myself on this trip and we were both living in misery because we started chasing the ultralight rabbit.

That ended up being one of the most miserable trips I’d ever been on and in reality, 3-4 more pounds in gear would have made a HUGE difference. When I look back at this, I don’t even know why we even tried to drop weight from the pack anyway. It wasn’t like we were out of shape. It was more because we got caught up in the ultra-lightweight fad and having the lightest pack was like a badge of honor or something. Well, that badge of honor became a jackass trophy real quick and anytime my friends and I start talking about dropping weight someone will always say, “Don’t chase the rabbit!” 

As a quick reference, I will give you type a list of what our actual pack weight would have increased if we would have brought our standard gear instead of the ultra-lightweight stuff. 





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14 Hits

Cheating the System in Montana

Father/Son duo Larry and Shane Adams from Emo, Ontario Canada have been sentenced to pay $28,295 to the State of Montana as restitution for residency fraud. The pair owned a home in Miles City, MT and used the address there to swindle the legal residents of Montana out of right around $84,000 worth of animals including a Missouri Breaks bighorn ram and a mountain goat.

Here is the damage done.

$84,000! That’s an awful lot of public assets illegally taken by men who are not even U.S. citizens. Oh, but they promised to obey the terms of the court while serving a five year forfeiture of their hunting privileges that is retroactive to 2014… that means that the father/son poaching duo will really only serve a one year suspension, or am I getting this wrong? 

 

Either way the residents of Montana have been cheated and robbed of a resource that will not be able to be repaid or restored. 

Seized trophies
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20 Hits

Kifaru 44 Mag Giveaway

Here is your chance at a new Kifaru 44 Mag Hunting Pack! The 44 MAG has pockets on the outside of the 500D Cordura bag, which I can report are perfect for the good stuff like spotting scopes and tripods.Between the top lid and the side pockets there is already a lot of organization present on this pack and add in the semi-custom nature of added pockets and it is very easy to build a pack that will work for the other gear that you prefer for backcountry excursions.These specific packs aren’t the largest of the Kifaru packs, but due to the complexity, they will morf into whatever you will need for the field. You will be able to purchase attachments(not included) to fit your exact needs for your next adventure. Sign up for this giveaway by filling out the form below. Good luck!

Loading…Sign up for this giveaway by filling out the form below. Good luck!

The post Kifaru 44 Mag Giveaway appeared first on Eastmans' Official Blog | Mule Deer, Antelope, Elk Hunting and Bowhunting Magazine | Eastmans' Hunting Journals.

  14 Hits
14 Hits

Sitka’s Early Season System





Guy Eastman breaks down his favorite early season Sitka camo system ideal for bow hunting. These carefully designed pieces are comfortable and effective for bow hunters from August through early October hunts. Eastman’s review covers the Core Lightweight Hoody, Apex Hoody, Mountain Vest and brand new Kelvin Active Hoody. Learn the how, when and why to combine and wear this Sitka layer system for your next bow hunt.

Get more details on Sitka’s Apex line: https://youtu.be/BSSRKHPGcEo

Check out Guy’s review of the Ascent system: https://youtu.be/29xyVF4V1_c

The post Sitka’s Early Season System appeared first on Eastmans' Official Blog | Mule Deer, Antelope, Elk Hunting and Bowhunting Magazine | Eastmans' Hunting Journals.

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15 Hits

Aspen Bear Nightmare!

“ASPEN, Colo. – Colorado Parks and Wildlife and Aspen Police officers responded to the 300 block of East Hopkins Avenue in Aspen at 11:30 last night after a large black bear bit a local restaurant manager, resulting in four deep puncture wounds to the man’s leg.”

The above is from a press release from CPW telling of an incident dealing with a black bear in a populated area who had decided that a trash dumpster was his new favorite place to frolic. Employees from the restaurant that owned the dumpster were refusing to dump their trash in the dumpster while the bear was getting an easy meal. The manager, in poor judgement, decided that trying to scare the bear out was the best course of action and for his trouble got a nice bite mark or two on his leg.

According to CPW the bear will have to be put down once it is located and because bears are habitual with incidents like this, it is highly unlikely they won’t find him. This incident highlights to great effect how urbanization in places like Colorado is negatively impacting animals, in particular, predators. This is the third incident in the Aspen area recently and it is unlikely that negative interactions will stop.

So how did it come to this in CO? Let’s start with the obvious, a growing population and year round tourism in places like Aspen is putting people with little to no experience with bears face to muzzle almost daily. 

With a growing trash output to match the growing human population it is pretty easy to see how opportunists like bears take to dumpster diving for an easy meal. Generally speaking there are two populations of bears that fall for the easy pickings, the youngest and oldest animals. The young animals have usually just been kicked off of their mother and they are searching for an easy meal. There is hope for these animals as moving them can be successful but it doesn’t take long to rack up three strikes.

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17 Hits

Bowhunting the Elk Rut

DIY bow hunter Dan Pickar takes to the timber of chasing rutting bull elk. Bow hunting the thick timber takes patience and makes closing the deal difficult. Pickar doesn’t back down and arrows a nice public land bull in this web edition of Eastmans’ Hunting TV.

The post Bowhunting the Elk Rut appeared first on Eastmans' Official Blog | Mule Deer, Antelope, Elk Hunting and Bowhunting Magazine | Eastmans' Hunting Journals.

  228 Hits
228 Hits

New Eberlestock Technical Hunting Apparel!

High country hunter Scott Reekers puts Eberlestock’s new technical hunting apparel to the test on an early season scouting trip. From pants to mid and outer layers and rain gear, Eberlestock now features a well rounded hunting clothing system. Reekers reviews the Afterburner Pants, Cache Peak Jacket, Lost River Jacket, Trinity Peak Shell and Diamond Peak Vest.

Want to learn more about Eberlestock’s clothing line-up check out this video next: https://youtu.be/at_BDwc-0W8

The post New Eberlestock Technical Hunting Apparel! appeared first on Eastmans' Official Blog | Mule Deer, Antelope, Elk Hunting and Bowhunting Magazine | Eastmans' Hunting Journals.

  96 Hits
96 Hits